Freakonomics Podcast

Here are latest Freakonomics Podcasts.

466. She’s From the Government, and She’s Here to Help

Listen to 466. She’s From the Government, and She’s Here to HelpCecilia Rouse, the chair of the White House Council of Economic Advisors, is as cold-blooded as any economist. But she admits that her profession would do well to focus on policy that actually helps people. Rouse explains why President Biden wants to spend trillions of dollars to reshape the economy, and why — as the first Black chair of the C.E.A. — she has a good idea of what needs fixing. 

465. Introducing a New “Freakonomics of Medicine” Podcast

Listen to 465. Introducing a New “Freakonomics of Medicine” PodcastBapu Jena was already a double threat: a doctor who’s also an economist. Now he’s a podcast host too. In this sneak preview of the Freakonomics Radio Network’s newest show,  Bapu discovers that marathons can be deadly — but not for the reasons you may think.

464. Will Work-from-Home Work Forever?

Listen to 464. Will Work-from-Home Work Forever?The pandemic may be winding down, but that doesn’t mean we’ll return to full-time commuting and packed office buildings. The greatest accidental experiment in the history of labor has lessons to teach us about productivity, flexibility, and even reversing the brain drain. But don’t buy another dozen pairs of sweatpants just yet.

463. How to Get Anyone to Do Anything

Listen to 463. How to Get Anyone to Do AnythingThe social psychologist Robert Cialdini is a pioneer in the science of persuasion. His 1984 book Influence is a classic, and he has just published an expanded and revised edition. In this episode of the Freakonomics Radio Book Club, he gives a master class in the seven psychological levers that bewitch our rational minds and lead us to buy, behave, or believe without a second thought. 

These Shoes Are Killing Me! (Ep. 296 Rebroadcast)

Listen to These Shoes Are Killing Me! (Ep. 296 Rebroadcast)The human foot is an evolutionary masterpiece, far more functional than we give it credit for. So why do we encase it in “a coffin” (as one foot scholar calls it) that stymies so much of its ability — and may create more problems than it solves?

462. The Future of New York City Is in Question. Could Andrew Yang Be the Answer?

Listen to 462. The Future of New York City Is in Question. Could Andrew Yang Be the Answer?The man who wants America to “think harder” has parlayed his quixotic presidential campaign into front-runner status in New York’s mayoral election. And he has some big plans.

461. How to Stop Worrying and Love the Robot Apocalypse

Listen to 461. How to Stop Worrying and Love the Robot ApocalypseIt’s true that robots (and other smart technologies) will kill many jobs. It may also be true that newer collaborative robots (“cobots”) will totally reinvigorate how work gets done. That, at least, is what the economists are telling us. Should we believe them?

460. The True Story of the Minimum-Wage Fight

Listen to 460. The True Story of the Minimum-Wage FightBackers of a $15 federal wage say it’s a no-brainer if you want to fight poverty. Critics say it’s a blunt instrument that leads to job loss. Even the economists can’t agree! We talk to a bunch of them — and a U.S. Senator — to sort it out, and learn there’s a much bigger problem to worry about.

459. Let’s Be Blunt: Marijuana Is a Boon for Older Workers

Listen to 459. Let’s Be Blunt: Marijuana Is a Boon for Older WorkersThe state-by-state rollout of legalized weed has given economists a perfect natural experiment to measure its effects. Here’s what we know so far — and don’t know — about the costs and benefits of legalization.

458. How to Manage Your Goal Hierarchy

Listen to 458. How to Manage Your Goal HierarchyIn this special crossover episode, People I (Mostly) Admire host Steve Levitt admits to No Stupid Questions co-host Angela Duckworth that he knows almost nothing about psychology. But once Angela gives Steve a quick tutorial on “goal conflict,” he is suddenly a fan. They also talk parenting, self-esteem, and how easy it is to learn econometrics if you feel like it. 

457. Is Dialysis a Test Case of Medicare for All?

Listen to 457. Is Dialysis a Test Case of Medicare for All?Kidney failure is such a catastrophic (and expensive) disease that Medicare covers treatment for anyone, regardless of age. Since Medicare reimbursement rates are fairly low, the dialysis industry had to find a way to tweak the system if they wanted to make big profits. They succeeded.

456. How to Fix the Hot Mess of U.S. Healthcare

Listen to 456. How to Fix the Hot Mess of U.S. HealthcareMedicine has evolved from a calling into an industry, adept at dispensing procedures and pills (and gigantic bills), but less good at actual health. Most reformers call for big, bold action. What happens if, instead, you think small? 

Policymaking Is Not a Science (Yet) (Ep. 405 Rebroadcast)

Listen to Policymaking Is Not a Science (Yet) (Ep. 405 Rebroadcast)Why do so many promising solutions — in education, medicine, criminal justice, etc. — fail to scale up into great policy? And can a new breed of “implementation scientists” crack the code?

How Does New York City Keep Reinventing Itself? (Bonus)

Listen to How Does New York City Keep Reinventing Itself? (Bonus)In a word: networks. Once it embraced information as its main currency, New York was able to climb out of a deep fiscal (and psychic) pit. Will that magic trick still work after Covid? In this installment of the Freakonomics Radio Book Club, guest host Kurt Andersen interviews Thomas Dyja, author of New York, New York, New York: Four Decades of Success, Excess and Transformation.

455. Are You Ready for a Fresh Start?

Listen to 455. Are You Ready for a Fresh Start?Behavioral scientists have been exploring if — and when — a psychological reset can lead to lasting change. We survey evidence from the London Underground, Major League Baseball, and New Year’s resolutions; we look at accidental fresh starts, forced fresh starts, and fresh starts that backfire. And we wonder: will the pandemic’s end provide the biggest fresh start ever?

454. Should Traffic Lights Be Abolished?

Listen to 454. Should Traffic Lights Be Abolished?Americans are so accustomed to the standard intersection that we rarely consider how dangerous it can be — as well as costly, time-wasting, and polluting. Is it time to embrace the lowly, lovely roundabout?

453. A Rescue Plan for Black America

Listen to 453. A Rescue Plan for Black AmericaNew York Times columnist Charles Blow argues that white supremacy in America will never fully recede, and that it’s time for Black people to do something radical about it. In The Devil You Know: A Black Power Manifesto, he urges a “reverse migration” to the South to consolidate political power and create a region where it’s safe to be Black. (This is an episode of the Freakonomics Radio Book Club.)

Am I Boring You? (Ep. 225 Rebroadcast)

Listen to Am I Boring You? (Ep. 225 Rebroadcast)Researchers are trying to figure out who gets bored — and why — and what it means for ourselves and the economy. But maybe there’s an upside to boredom?

452. Jeff Immelt Knows He Let You Down

Listen to 452. Jeff Immelt Knows He Let You DownNot so long ago, G.E. was the most valuable company in the world, a conglomerate that included everything from light bulbs and jet engines to financial services and The Apprentice. Now it’s selling off body parts to survive. What does the C.E.O. who presided over the decline have to say for himself? 

451. Can I Ask You a Ridiculously Personal Question?

Listen to 451. Can I Ask You a Ridiculously Personal Question?Most of us are are afraid to ask sensitive questions about money, sex, politics, etc. New research shows this fear is largely unfounded. Time for some interesting conversations!

Freakonomics Podcast

Author Stephen J. Dubner

 

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