Freakonomics Podcast

Here are latest Freakonomics Podcasts.

411. Is $2 Trillion the Right Medicine for a Sick Economy?

Listen to 411. Is $2 Trillion the Right Medicine for a Sick Economy?Congress just passed the biggest aid package in modern history. We ask six former White House economic advisors and one U.S. Senator: Will it actually work? What are its best and worst features? Where does $2 trillion come from, and what are the long-term effects of all that government spending? 

410. What Does Covid-19 Mean for Cities (and Marriages)?

Listen to 410. What Does Covid-19 Mean for Cities (and Marriages)?There are a lot of upsides to urban density — but viral contagion is not one of them. Also: a nationwide lockdown will show if familiarity really breeds contempt. And: how to help your neighbor.

409. The Side Effects of Social Distancing

Listen to 409. The Side Effects of Social DistancingIn just a few weeks, the novel coronavirus has undone a century’s worth of our economic and social habits. What consequences will this have on our future — and is there a silver lining in this very black pandemic cloud?

Why Rent Control Doesn’t Work (Ep. 373 Rebroadcast)

Listen to Why Rent Control Doesn’t Work (Ep. 373 Rebroadcast)As cities become ever-more expensive, politicians and housing advocates keep calling for rent control. Economists think that’s a terrible idea. They say it helps a small (albeit noisy) group of renters, but keeps overall rents artificially high by disincentivizing new construction. So what happens next?

408. Does Anyone Really Know What Socialism Is?

Listen to 408. Does Anyone Really Know What Socialism Is?Trump says it would destroy us. Sanders says it will save us. The majority of millennials would like it to replace capitalism. But what is “it”? We bring in the economists to sort things out and tell us what the U.S. can learn from the good (and bad) experiences of other (supposedly) socialist countries.

407. Is There Really a “Loneliness Epidemic”?

Listen to 407. Is There Really a “Loneliness Epidemic”?That’s what some health officials are saying, but the data aren’t so clear. We look into what’s known (and not known) about the prevalence and effects of loneliness — including the possible upsides.

406. Can You Hear Me Now?

Listen to 406. Can You Hear Me Now?When he became chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Ajit Pai announced that he was going to take a “weed whacker” to Obama-era regulations. So far, he’s kept his promise, and earned the internet’s ire for reversing the agency’s position on net neutrality. Pai defends his actions and explains how the U.S. can “win” everything from the 5G race to the war on robocalls.

405. Policymaking Is Not a Science (Yet)

Listen to 405. Policymaking Is Not a Science (Yet)Why do so many promising solutions — in education, medicine, criminal justice, etc. — fail to scale up into great policy? And can a new breed of “implementation scientists” crack the code? 

404. Does the President Matter as Much as You Think?

Listen to 404. Does the President Matter as Much as You Think?We asked this same question nearly a decade ago. The answer then: probably not. But a lot has changed since then, and we’re three years into one of the most anomalous presidencies in American history. So once again we try to sort out presidential signal from noise. What we hear from legal and policy experts may leave you surprised, befuddled — and maybe infuriated.

How the San Francisco 49ers Stopped Being Losers (Ep. 350 Update)

Listen to How the San Francisco 49ers Stopped Being Losers (Ep. 350 Update)One of the most storied (and valuable) sports franchises in the world had fallen far. So they decided to do a full reboot — and it worked: this week, they are headed back to the Super Bowl. Before the 2018 season, we sat down with the team’s owner, head coach, general manager, and players as they were plotting their turnaround. Here’s an update of that episode. 

403. The Opioid Tragedy, Part 2: “It’s Not a Death Sentence”

Listen to 403. The Opioid Tragedy, Part 2: “It’s Not a Death Sentence”One prescription drug is keeping some addicts from dying. So why isn’t it more widespread? A story of regulation, stigma, and the potentially fatal faith in abstinence.

402. The Opioid Tragedy, Part 1: “We’ve Addicted an Entire Generation”

Listen to 402. The Opioid Tragedy, Part 1: “We’ve Addicted an Entire Generation”How pharma greed, government subsidies, and a push to make pain the “fifth vital sign” kicked off a crisis that costs $80 billion a year and has killed hundreds of thousands of Americans.

401. How Many Prince Charleses Can There Be in One Room?

Listen to 401. How Many Prince Charleses Can There Be in One Room?In a special holiday episode, Stephen Dubner and Angela Duckworth take turns asking each other questions about charisma, wealth vs. intellect, and (of course) grit.

389. How to Make Meetings Less Terrible

Listen to 389. How to Make Meetings Less TerribleIn the U.S. alone, we hold 55 million meetings a day. Most of them are woefully unproductive, and tyrannize our offices. The revolution begins now — with better agendas, smaller invite lists, and an embrace of healthy conflict.

388. The Economics of Sports Gambling

Listen to 388. The Economics of Sports GamblingWhat happens when tens of millions of fantasy-sports players are suddenly able to bet real money on real games? We’re about to find out. A recent Supreme Court decision has cleared the way to bring an estimated $300 billion in black-market sports betting into the light. We sort out the winners and losers.

386. How the Supermarket Helped America Win the Cold War

Listen to 386. How the Supermarket Helped America Win the Cold WarAisle upon aisle of fresh produce, cheap meat, and sugary cereal — a delicious embodiment of free-market capitalism, right? Not quite. The supermarket was in fact the endpoint of the U.S. government’s battle for agricultural abundance against the U.S.S.R. Our farm policies were built to dominate, not necessarily to nourish — and we are still living with the consequences.

384. Abortion and Crime, Revisited

Listen to 384. Abortion and Crime, RevisitedThe controversial theory linking Roe v. Wade to a massive crime drop is back in the spotlight as several states introduce abortion restrictions. Steve Levitt and John Donohue discuss their original research, the challenges to its legitimacy, and their updated analysis. Also: what this means for abortion policy, crime policy, and having intelligent conversations about contentious topics.

383. The Zero-Minute Workout

Listen to 383. The Zero-Minute WorkoutThere is strong evidence that exercise is wildly beneficial. There is even stronger evidence that most people hate to exercise. So if a pill could mimic the effects of working out, why wouldn’t we want to take it?

379. How to Change Your Mind

Listen to 379. How to Change Your MindThere are a lot of barriers to changing your mind: ego, overconfidence, inertia — and cost. Politicians who flip-flop get mocked; family and friends who cross tribal borders are shunned. But shouldn’t we be encouraging people to change their minds? And how can we get better at it ourselves?

374. How Spotify Saved the Music Industry (But Not Necessarily Musicians)

Listen to 374. How Spotify Saved the Music Industry (But Not Necessarily Musicians)Daniel Ek, a 23-year-old Swede who grew up on pirated music, made the record labels an offer they couldn’t refuse: a legal platform to stream all the world’s music. Spotify reversed the labels’ fortunes, made Ek rich, and thrilled millions of music fans. But what has it done for all those musicians stuck in the long tail?

 

Sponsors - 1 eBooks - 1 Music - 1 Movies - 1 News

iPodcast TM

PodcastsNews - Directory - Reviews

iPodcastTM is Produced by 1 MEDIA

 
 

Freakonomics Podcast

Author Stephen J. Dubner

 

 

PODCASTS

DIRECTORY

REVIEWS

NEWS

 

Sponsors - 1 eBooks - 1 Music - 1 Movies - 1 News

iPodcast TM

PodcastsNews - Directory - Reviews

iPodcastTM is Produced by 1 MEDIA